Thursday, November 29, 2012

18th Century Embroidered Pockets

If you remember, back when I made my Chemise a la Reine, I also made the correct undergarments to wear with it. These undergarments included a set of 18th century pockets. However, unlike extant examples, I never got a chance to embroider mine.

From the Museum of Bath, England, mid 18th century
That is, until now! I picked up my pockets the other day and bought a package of embroidery needles and a few colors of thread: a soft, mossy green; a deep blue; a cornflower blue; a powder blue; a magenta; and a dusty rose. I used a satin stitch technique I found in a book from my local library, and I love how plush and full this stitch is.

This project doesn't really have a deadline, it's more of like a pick-up-put-down project, like I'll work on it in the car or when I'm waiting around without anything else to do. I've found that embroidering is CRAZY good at relieving stress, I did the bulk of this in school and on vacation, and in school it really helped me to block out all the stress and noise for a little while.

My embroidery design is loosely based on this image:


So, how about some in progress pics?

I really do love the color scheme, the muted raspberry and golds against the strong azure.

Some more work still to be done on the left side...

All that's left on this side is to fill in the stems and vines with green thread!

I started filling in the stem here, but don't like the color green I chose. Going to tear it out and try using the same green as the lighter green of the leaves and berry stems. But look at that crazy gold flower!


The other pocket--not nearly as much done, but you can see the faint outline of the design.


Monday, November 19, 2012

Portugal 2012: Part 2

Time for some pictures of the wonderful quasi-tropical super quaint paradise that is Southern Portugal! These are from the old city of Albufeira, Algarve.

The cliffside beach wasn't this big the last time I visited--it must've had sand added to it.

No waves!

The view of the newer portion of the city, from the room we were staying in.

That cool, clear water!



The traditional white facades and orange tile rooftops.

Cliffside graffiti!

Hibiscus flowers in a church garden at the top of the cliff.

Sunday, November 11, 2012

Female Link Cosplay Commission

Sorry I  don't have a DIY Inspiration post for you all today, things have been a little hectic up here in the East Coast! Thankfully my family and I weren't battered too badly by Hurricane Sandy, but there are places so close to us that felt the awful effects of such a powerful storm. That was followed up by a bit of snow right before my 19th birthday, which was not too bad at all (:

Anywho, since I haven't posted about sewing in a while, I figured I might show my readers one of my recent sewing commissions: a feminine Link costume!

My client wanted to cosplay Link for Comic Con (jeez, I know, I should've made this post about a month ago!), but wanted a dress she could wear for other occasions--in other words, not something so obviously costume-y.



I designed and drafted a pattern for a princess-seamed dress, with a high-low hem, a soft v-neck, and short sleeves which would retain the iconic characteristics of Link (the particular shade of green, the v-neck) with wearable modern touches (the high-low hem). My dress had gores between the seams from the hip to the hem, adding nice swishiness to the dress. The dress was completely lined in a complementing shade of green polyester satin stuff (seriously, the fabric one buys at Walmart, sometimes doesn't even FEEL like fabric...) and the zipper (brown, to pick up on the brown tones of the character's belt and boots) was completely hand sewn in, nested between the lining and outer fabric on the center back seam, and definitely my best zipper to date. I also made Link's cap, literally two triangles sewn to a band which was then turned under and slip-stitched.

And might I add she makes a great Link! 
A view of the whole dress--the princess seams fit perfectly!
Close-up of the princess seam